Geological dating of mountains Chat sites for extreme adults


17-Jun-2017 14:01

Different isotopes of an element have similar chemical properties (undergo similar chemical reactions) but have different physical properties (such as evaporation rates).

However, we can predict what fraction of the parent atoms will decay over a certain amount of time because each radioactive isotope has a constant rate of decay (unaffected by temperature, pressure, or chemical state).

Carbon-14 has a relatively short half life of 5,730 years. Beyond 60,000 - 80,000 years, there is too little Carbon-14 left in the sample and this technique cannot be used.

U nuclei undergo fission and the nucleus splits to form two smaller but very energetic nuclei that move away from each other.

Sedimentary rocks- Sedimentary rocks are generally not datable using isotopic methods because the grains in sedimentary rocks may come from many different rocks of different ages.

Isotopic age dating would not give the age of the sediment deposition or lithification, but rather the age of the source rocks.

Mountains, erosion, and variations in climate were considered to be punishment for the sins committed by humanity.

Buffon's Iron Sphere Experiments- On the basis of iron sphere cooling experiments, Frenchman Georges de Buffon estimated that the Earth would have needed 75,000 years to cool to its present temperature.

This plate boundary has shaped the size of New Zealand and also defines its geology.The quantitative approach is admirable, but Buffon's assumptions are flawed. Silicate minerals have lower heat conductivity than steels and are better insulators leading to slower cooling rates.Second, the calculations did not incorporate the heating effects of radioactive decay.The collision of these plates caused the Pacific plate to subduct underneath the Australian plate which carries the North Island.

To the south of the South Island, the situation is reversed.

Modern New Zealand is world renown for being geological active with high mountains, frequent earthquakes, geothermally active areas and volcanoes.